Things to do in Granada

Oasis Hostel City Guide Granada

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  • Museums

Museums

Granada is rich with history going back centuries, with contributions from several diverse cultures and periods. Learn all you can from the city's many free museums and don't hesitate to shell out the super cheap entry fees to see what else you can discover.


Casa de los Tiros

This cool museum is free for EU citizens and cheap for everyone else interested in getting a history fix while in Granada. The 16th century fortress is now a library and museum with lots of fascinating sites. A favourite is the Cuadra Dorada, where you can see swords carved into the stone walls and ceiling beams, along with images of Spanish kings and local heroes.

Exhibitions in the Carlos V Palace

Right in the middle of Alhambra, in the palace of Carlos V you can enjoy exhibitions displaying the work of Spanish artists. Make you sure to check to website of Alhambra to find one, as they are not happening everyday. Free entry for EU citizens.


Parque de las Ciencias

Embrace your inner nerd and have some hands-on fun with science. The place is very kid friendly, but caters to all. Visit the science park to have some fun and to learn something new. The entrance is only 6€.

Museo de la Abadía del Sacromonte

The Museo de la Abadía del Sacromonte, on the sacred mountain, presents works by Spanish artists, manuscripts from the period of Arab rule and miniature books which give an insight into the history of print art in Andalusia.


Cathedral Museum

As is the case of most Christian buildings in Granada, the Cathedral was built on the site of the former Mosque. Work on the cathedral began on 15th March 1523 and it was not completed until 180 years later, in 1704, as building stopped during the Plague.

Monasterio la Cartuja

You won't find a more lavish baroque interior in the whole of Spain. The church belonging to this Carthusian monastery abounds with coloured marble, jasper, and porphyry as well as displaying paintings by Juan Sanchez de Cotan. Construction began in 1516 and only finished 300 years later.